Driving on the Nurbugring Nordeschleife

Our Top Ten facts about the Nurburgring Nordschleife

All you need to know about this infamous circuit

The Nurburgring Nordschleife is one of the most iconic circuits in the world. It is probably the ultimate and most challenging track for any driver, but with Marot Pro Driving in your team we know we can help you get the most out of every minute you spend on this famous circuit.

Every year we take a group of performance driving enthusiast to Germany so they can take on the challenge of the “Green Hell”, as the Nurburgring Nordschleife is very affectionately known by enthusiasts. Every year we learn something new about the track and the very beautiful area of Germany that it is located.

So here are our Top 10 Facts about the Nurburgring Nordschleife

  1. The Nurburgring was constructed to ease unemployment in the Eifel region of North West Germany. Over 25,000 people were utilised in the construction between 1925 and 1927.
  2. The man who initiated this masterpiece  was politician Dr Otto Cruez. Later suspected of fraud by the Nazis he eventually committed suicide.
  3. The track consists of a staggering 14.1 million Reichsmarks to construct. In todays money this roughly translates to €36 million.
  4. It originally consisted of 14.2 miles of Nordschleife and a 4.8 mile Sudschleif. The Nordscheife  (Northern loop) has since been shortened to 12.9 miles, with parts of the Sudschleife becoming the new Nurburgring Formula 1 track in the early 1980’s.
  5. The Nordschleife is a toll road open to the general public. It is only closed during testing events, races and due to inclement weather. At €23 per lap, drivers still need to be aware that German road regulations strictly apply. This means overtaking is only allowed on the left and believe it or not, “posted” speed limits do apply!
  6. The fastest lap to date on this infamous 12.9 mile track, was set by Stefan Bellof. In 1983 Stefan drove a Porsche 956 around in 6 min 11.13 secs averaging 125.6 mph! Previously in 1975 on the 14.2 mile track, F1 Champion Niki Lauda posted 6 mins 58.6 secs in a Ferrari 312T averaging 122mph.
  7. Approximately 305m separates the highest and lowest points of the circuit.
  8. The lap record for a production car belongs to Michael Vergers, who put together a 6.48 lap in a Radical SR8LM. Truly a machine that pushes production car terminology to the extremes.
  9. There are 33 left hand bends and 40 right handers according to the official website. However, if you carefully study in car footage of high speed laps you may be able to count between 85 and 100 turn. whichever way you count it, this circuit is extremely complex and challenging.
  10. Approaching it’s ninetieth birthday, differing sources put the number of fatalities in excess of 80. It is also worth pointing out that should you have an accident and damage any of the Armco barriers, you or your surviving family will end up footing the bill. Should the track be closed for an extended period then you will also foot the bill for that too!

Watch this!

In this edited clip, Mike is instructing our client Ben around the very challenging Nurburgring Nordschleife in a race prepared track car.

Highly experienced in this iconic circuit, Mike calmly shows Ben the lines to take, whilst keeping an eye out for everything else that is happening during the session.

This is a tiring experience for first timers, but when you have an expert like Mike at your side, you will find it a lot more relaxed and enjoyable.

Drive the “Green Hell”

However don’t let the Green Hell scare you off. This highly demanding circuit is well worth the effort. Every year Mike Marot and the team escort our performance driving clients to pay homage and enjoy a track experience like no other.

Accompanying our clients on and off the track, we create a low key event to help every driver get the most from this famous circuit.

If you also want to get the most from driving round this iconic circuit then contact us for more information about our next visit.

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